16 thoughts on “The Journey Begins”

  1. I think Tailoring your RSS and digital newsfeed to receive information that you want, widens your horizon because you’re able to get news faster and at the tip of your fingers.This is because in today’s world most breaking news are released on social media platforms before they are shown on television, making it easier for followers and viewers to get the information in real time. For me personally I like to get my news as soon as it happens because it keeps me up to date on what Is taking place no matter where I am or what time it is.I also know that not everything released on social media is completely factual, so I tend to cross reference the news I get on social media with a news site. According to this week’s reading not all information posted online is factual. There are times when I don’t notice I am doing it, but I like to make sure the information is true before I tell my friends what has taken place. For example when 26 year old rapper, Mac Miller passed away, I saw the news first on my Instagram news feed. I automatically though it was a lie so I went on google and typed his name and went to the news section, where I saw that news and entertainment sites had also posted the story.

    I think this can also limit our exposure to the world because if you only focus on things that concern you the most, you will be unwilling to seek out other information or the truth because according to this weeks reading certain information released are false and can cause harm. For example if I only focus on entertainment news I won’t know what’s going on in the real world nor would I know if it’s factual.The reading for this week also made a valid point in terms of knowing what to believe with news that are released because things can be tampered with, including videos and pictures (Ward) Work Cited
    Ward, Stephen J. A . “ Digital Media Ethics.” Center for Journalism Ethics ,retrieved 9, Sep. 2018. https://ethics.journalism.wisc.edu/resources/digital-media-ethics/

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  2. Alex Luckoo
    About four years ago I downloaded an app called Flipboard. The basic point of the app is to provide aggregate news personalized by the interests of the user. Upon the initial opening of the app users are prompted to subscribe to interesting topics. Based on those selections similar options are presented as suggestions. At the time, the idea of the app seemed perfect since reading more was a lot easier when I’d only be shown pieces I’m guaranteed to enjoy; things like mobile technology, animal species exploration, medical breakthroughs and sports. Today, Facebook is arguably the dominant infrastructure for “communities”. While I haven’t been a user of Facebook since the evolution of the services it provides, I do use Twitter which is somewhat similar. Users of Twitter “follow” their friends, potential friends or just people that share similar ideas or interests. Similar to the communities that Facebook and other social websites foster, this ability for users to ultimately choose what information they’re exposed to is a major part of what drives positive or at least entertaining interaction. As ideal as it’d for people with differences in opinion to communicate in a civil manner, that isn’t often the case when certain topics arise. In fact, instead of taking advantage of the wealth of knowledge at our finger-tips and expanding our point of view, our customized feeds increases our insularity and encourages extremist thought. (Plaisance, 62) “The architecture of sites such as Facebook, while popular, also are limiting in significant ways.” (Pleasance, 62). The idea of “community” that they promote might expand one’s horizons by furthering knowledge on topics of interest but depending on the people from which the information comes, certain ideas could be skewed as a result of preexisting assumptions or underlying political agendas. These communities might also have an air of antagonism about them in my opinion. Members might be hostile toward any views that opposes that of the collective. This results in limited exposure to the world. It certain doesn’t help that media platforms want their users to belong to distinct communities. The different collection of interests is sold to advertisers, so they can tailor the products that pop up on you screen. “Stereotyping is alive and well in these types of data aggregation practices” says law professor Lori Andrews. (Plaisance, 60)

    Plaisance, Patrick Lee. Media Ethics: Key Principles for Responsible Practice. second ed., SAGE, 2014.

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  3. Alex, excellent post! You made me consider how sometimes reporters use Twitter to report a story. I personally don’t. But I know our public safety reporter has used it when he’s covered a major breaking story or if he’s covering a trial. You talk about stereotyping and limiting certain people access, do you think posting a story or breaking news on Twitter a fair and balanced way of distributing information? Or is it being biased to specifically those who access Twitter? And we spoke in class about how I’ve researched certain information for a story at work and then all of a sudden I was targeted my certain advertisements that had nothing to do with my personal life that I was a little disturbed by. How did they know I did this or was looking at that? Should companies be doing this to our news as well? Should certain media outlets be targeting specific audiences?

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  4. Jacqui White
    Media Ethics Blog Post
    Some online communities I’ve joined based on my interests include Twitter, Tumblr and Facebook. On Facebook, I’m able to see my friends and family post stuff about their lives as well as see groups I’ve joined post things as well. Groups I’ve joined on Facebook include the pet rescues where I adopted my dogs from and Occupy Democrats.
    The pet rescue group on Facebook I’ve joined help me keep connected with people who also adopted their pets from the rescues, see any dogs that are available for adoption as well as post pictures of my own dogs so the former foster parents can see how they are doing. Being in Occupy Democrats is also important because it helps me see what’s going on in the political world without having to leave the social media site I’m on.
    Even though I can’t really join groups on Twitter, I mainly use that to follow celebrities that I like or to follow my friends as well. I can also see what’s being talked about on Twitter, since it’ll pop up from time to time so that helps me stay informed as well.
    Tumblr is the online community I go on to see what people are saying about my favorite movies or shows. I go on to also keep updated with political issues.
    To make sure I don’t miss important updates, I have CNN on my phone and have the notifications turned on. Whenever there’s a breaking news story, I get the notification and usually read what’s on the summary. If I feel like it’s actually important to me, I’ll open the app to read the full story and maybe share it with my friends and family later on. (291 words)

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  5. Jacqui,
    Awesome that you are politically involved. If one day you decide to be a reporter or work for a news agency, how important do you feel it would be for you to be able to continue with your involvement? Do you feel you would be able to separate your beliefs when it came time to reporting a story that was balanced or how would you feel interviewing someone with totally opposing views?

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  6. Morgan Golliver

    Growing up, I didn’t have a cellphone nor a computer with internet to access news, so I had to watch t.v. I watched Sports Center every morning before school to know what was going on in sports and I also watched the WBNG news station to hear about local news and weather around my area as well as any school closings. Today, I feel as if I am addicted to the internet whether consuming it on my phone or laptop.
    Every morning when I wake up, there is no doubt that I’ll reach for my phone to check notifications on all of the social media platforms I use, such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat. I spend roughly 10 to 15 minutes on Facebook before getting ready for the day. Sometimes my Facebook is filled with so many posts, it is hard to see any actual news that is going on in my area because Facebook allows its users to post what’s on their mind and tell the world “Hey, pay attention to me!” rather than focus on news (Plaisance, 65). But with new options, users can choose “see first” under notifications of a friend, family member, or a page they like, so their posts will appear on the user’s timeline first before anything else. This makes it easier to see updates on what you like rather than scroll through to find it. I use the “see first” option on all my favorite sports teams, so I can then post updates on my sports page rather than fill my personal timeline, as friends may not care about them.
    I also use the ESPN app and sometimes google search for sports news aside from Facebook. I remember searching a team in the New York Mets division to see the score of their recent game and the next time I used google, I saw updates of that team on the bottom of my google app to let me know recent news and scores in case I wanted to find out more about them. It’s smart for Google to do that and remember the things we like, but people would rather just search for things on their own and not be distracted by them. With ESPN, I can get notifications sent directly to my lock screen when I cannot watch a live game. I have everything I need at my fingertips, but this only causes me to look at my phone all the time even during times when I should be studying or talking with friends. But, in my generation, all this behavior seems to be normal and unlike elders, some of our peers will not care if we’re on our phones because they also are.

    Sources
    Plaisance, Patrick L. Media Ethics Key Principles for Responsible Practice. 2nd ed., SAGE Publications, 2013.

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  7. Morgan, you make a good point in asking the question, without quite asking it: How much is too much? We’ve been talking a lot here about how social media, apps, RSS, what have you can limit our exposure because they can become too customized. But if we’re constantly “plugged in” to something or like you said, Google sees we looked up the Philly’s roster once and they’ve guessed we’re now a huge fan, worse Atlanta Braves. I made the mistake of picking a Jacksonville RB for my Fantasy Football today and had a Jaguars promo pop up ALREADY! It’s instant and yes how can we concentrate with all this “noise” in the background? Do you think there are any dangers of being too exposed? Is there a such thing?

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    1. Like you said, it is very instant, but sometimes the fault is on us to be so connected because we set up our notifications that pop up on our screens immediately when we’re connected to the internet. Then, we may never go back into our settings and change the way the notifications come to us. I personally enjoy these notifications because I can follow a sports game through ESPN notifications, even if I cannot watch it. To block out these notifications while working on homework or other things, I usually turn my phone to airplane mode, so I can concentrate on my work, even though I still am wondering what’s going on in sports or another topic I follow. I think there may be dangers of being too exposed, but we don’t think about it. We just continue using our phones non-stop without thinking how much time we spend on them until we get a massive headache from looking at the screen for too long. I know the new IOS 12 update on Iphones has a setting where you can limit the amount of screen time per app and I tried it once and got annoyed and had to turn it off because I was in the middle of checking my notifications and it said I had used up the two hours of social media I set it to. Then, I realized I spent too much time on social media, but I feel social media is important in what I want to do in the future as sports teams use social media to keep their fans updated at all times.

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  8. Personally, I am on all social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram And Snapchat. I never really took into consideration how the things I follow or see on those platforms really affected me or my interests. I guess my RSS is really determined by the accounts I choose to follow and why I decided to follow them in the first place and I never really took the time to fully sit and think about that until now. For the most part, I’m bad when it comes to keeping up with the news and what is going on in the world. I mostly use social media to see what my friends are up to or to follow funny pages or cute animal pages. Usually if I’m on one of these sites I can sit there and watch videos for who knows how long, without even realizing the information or news I’m receiving.
    I think that limiting yourself to only following certain pages really keeps you from seeing what else is happening in the world. For example, if I continue to only follow cute animals or funny pages then I’m limited to only informing myself about those things. This is not necessarily a good thing, because even though those are topics that interest me, not only are they quite miniscule in the grand scheme of things, but only following pages such as those limits my ability to gain knowledge about possibly more important things. That’s why more people should have apps such as the New York Times on their phones. Even getting a daily notification with just one thing that is going on in the world is so much better than limiting yourself to what you choose to pay attention to on social media. To add onto that, social media can sometimes be biased with the information they give to people, and that’s a whole other issue.

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  9. Sandra, Hmmmm a whole other issue indeed, so how are Facebook and other social media sites biased and why? Actually I haven’t run into it personally, but I’ve heard lots of people, including friends, complained that they got out of a group or unfriended someone because they were tired of their political posts or were offended by them. It’s free speech, but then again, what does it mean if someone is using hate speech or posting what they believe is the truth about an issue but they never bothered to research the facts? What harm can this cause?

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  10. Sam Northrup
    Facebook and Twitter continue to connect us in ways that simply weren’t possible not all that long ago. Both have changed from ways to “keep in touch” to catalysts of global communities and subcultures of users looking to share ideas and experiences with one another — for better or worse. While social media’s contributions to society and how we communicate are immense, it is becoming more and more apparent that the power to tailor our feeds is causing us to enter an “echo chamber,” where users become closed off by immersing themselves in communities and sources they prefer to engage with.Personally, I think there is no denying the benefits of the connected world social media has created for humanity. While 15 years ago we were limited to what newspapers and local broadcasts reported on, we have all become global citizens as social media has given us an unlimited source of information from around the world. At the same time, the power to choose what we follow and filter into our RSS feeds has limited our exposure to differing points of view. If the past two years have shown us anything, it is that online communities have as much powerto connect as it they do to divide us.

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    1. A study published by researchers in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) found that social media, mainly Facebook, make us more narrow-minded. Conducted in 2016, Italian researchers looked at how information was disseminated across 67 public pages, 32 about conspiracy theories and 35 about science news. They concluded “users tend to aggregate in communities of interest, which causes reinforcement and fosters confirmation bias,” which “leads to proliferation of biased narratives fomented by unsubstantiated rumors, mistrust, and paranoia.” (Del Vicario, Michela, et al, 2016).

      Work Cited:
      Del Vicario, Michela, et al. “The Spreading of Misinformation Online.”
      Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2016, http://www.pnas.org/content/113/3/554.

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  11. Sam, “If the past two years have shown us anything…” I would have loved if you delved into what that was. I know what you’re talking about but I’d like to see some examples. I want to see evidence of the division. And yes, you can say the world has become much smaller, hasn’t it? We can find something in an instance but if someone out there in cyberland is sending us a news feed based on a previous search, in other words someone else is deciding for us what we should be exposed to, is that ethical journalism or is that being biased?

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